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Stem Cell Self-Renewal Specified by JAK-STAT Activation in Response to a Support Cell Cue

Science
21 Dec 2001
Vol 294, Issue 5551
pp. 2542-2545

Abstract

Stem cells generate many differentiated, short-lived cell types, such as blood, skin, and sperm, throughout adult life. Stem cells maintain a long-term capacity to divide, producing daughter cells that either self-renew or initiate differentiation. Although the surrounding microenvironment or “niche” influences stem cell fate decisions, few signals that emanate from the niche to specify stem cell self-renewal have been identified. Here we demonstrate that the apical hub cells in the Drosophila testis act as a cellular niche that supports stem cell self-renewal. Hub cells express the ligand Unpaired (Upd), which activates the Janus kinase–signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) pathway in adjacent germ cells to specify self-renewal and continual maintenance of the germ line stem cell population.

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Males carrying UAS-upd+/+; nanos-GAL4:VP16 (nos-GAL4), UAS-GFPS65T (17, 22) were raised at 25°C until they matured into larvae or adults, shifted to 29°C, then held for 5 to 10 days before scoring phenotypes. hop25/FM7, Kr-GFP10; nos-GAL4, UAS-GFPS65T females were crossed to UAS-upd+ males and larval progeny genotyped by Kr-GFP expression.
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We thank D. Harrison, N. Perrimon, C. Dearolf, S. DiNardo, M. Van Doren, and D. Godt for providing fly stocks and reagents, and E. Bach, P. Khavari, R. Nusse, D. Traver, P. Langer, and the Fuller lab for comments. We thank E. Matunis for discussing similar findings (23). This work was supported by a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Predoctoral Fellowship (A.A.K.), NIH grant P01-DK53074 (M.T.F.), NIH training grants GM07790-22 (M.B.R.) and HD07493 (D.L.J.), and a European Molecular Biology Organization postdoctoral fellowship (C.S.). D.L.J. is a Lilly Fellow of the Life Sciences Research Foundation.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Science
Volume 294 | Issue 5551
21 December 2001

Submission history

Received: 1 October 2001
Accepted: 7 November 2001
Published in print: 21 December 2001

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Authors

Affiliations

Amy A. Kiger*,
Department of Developmental Biology and
D. Leanne Jones*
Department of Developmental Biology and
Cordula Schulz
Department of Developmental Biology and
Madolyn B. Rogers
Department of Developmental Biology and
Margaret T. Fuller
Department of Developmental Biology and
Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305–5329, USA.

Notes

*
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Present address: Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
To whom correspondence should be addressed at the Department of Developmental Biology, Beckman Center B300, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305–5329, USA. E-mail: [email protected]

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