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Abstract

Many intracellular pathogens infect a broad range of host tissues, but the importance of T cells for immunity in these sites is unclear because most of our understanding of antimicrobial T cell responses comes from analyses of lymphoid tissue. Here, we show that in response to viral or bacterial infection, antigen-specific CD8 T cells migrated to nonlymphoid tissues and were present as long-lived memory cells. Strikingly, CD8 memory T cells isolated from nonlymphoid tissues exhibited effector levels of lytic activity directly ex vivo, in contrast to their splenic counterparts. These results point to the existence of a population of extralymphoid effector memory T cells poised for immediate response to infection.

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We thank J. Altman for modified H-2Kb cDNA and E. Pamer for β2-microglobulin constructs. Supported by U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) grants DK45260 and AI41576, by USPHS training grant T32-AI07080 (D.M. and V.V.), and by a collaborative grant from the Edward Jenner Institute for Vaccine Research and a C. J. Martin Fellowship (007151) (A.L.M.).

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Science
Volume 291 | Issue 5512
23 March 2001

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Submission history

Received: 8 January 2001
Accepted: 16 February 2001
Published in print: 23 March 2001

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Authors

Affiliations

David Masopust
Division of Immunology, Department of Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06030, USA.
Vaiva Vezys
Division of Immunology, Department of Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06030, USA.
Amanda L. Marzo
Division of Immunology, Department of Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06030, USA.
Leo Lefrançois*
Division of Immunology, Department of Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06030, USA.

Notes

*
To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: [email protected]

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