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Measuring the path toward malaria elimination

Science13 Jun 2014Vol 344, Issue 6189pp. 1230-1232DOI: 10.1126/science.1251449

Abstract

In many parts of the world, malaria elimination—defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the absence of locally acquired malaria cases in the country—is being considered as a target because of recent successes in reducing disease burden (1, 2). Rigorous evaluation of malaria elimination programs is essential for financial and political support to be maintained. Yet such evaluation remains challenging, and appropriate metrics to ascertain “success” are needed.

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References and Notes

1
WHO, “Disease surveillance for malaria elimination: An operational manual” (WHO, Geneva, 2012).
2
WHO, “World malaria report: 2013” (WHO, Geneva, 2013).
3
Cohen J. M., Moonen B., Snow R. W., Smith D. L., Malar. J. 9, 213 (2010).
4
Hay S. I., Smith D. L., Snow R. W., Lancet Infect. Dis. 8, 369 (2008).
5
Kunene S., Phillips A. A., Gosling R. D., Kandula D., Novotny J. M., Malar. J. 10, 313 (2011).
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Cauchemez S., et al., PLOS Med. 10, e1001399 (2013).
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Hsiang M. S., et al., PLOS ONE 7, e29550 (2012).
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Dureau J., Kalogeropoulos K., Baguelin M., Biostatistics 14, 541 (2013).
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Smith D. L., Hay S. I., Noor A. M., Snow R. W., Trends Parasitol. 25, 511 (2009).

Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Science
Volume 344 | Issue 6189
13 June 2014

Submission history

Received: 28 January 2014
Accepted: 27 May 2014
Published in print: 13 June 2014

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Acknowledgments

We thank the European Union (FP7-PREDEMICS); the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH, MIDAS initiative; Labex Integrative Biology of Emerging Infectious Diseases; and Medical Research Council for financial support and the Swaziland Malaria Elimination Program for data collection.

Authors

Affiliations

Thomas S. Churcher
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, London, UK.
Justin M. Cohen
Clinton Health Access Initiative, Boston, MA 02127, USA.
Joseph Novotny
Clinton Health Access Initiative, Boston, MA 02127, USA.
Global Health Group, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
Nyasatu Ntshalintshali
Clinton Health Access Initiative, Boston, MA 02127, USA.
Global Health Group, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
Simon Kunene
National Malaria Control Program, Manzini, Swaziland.
Simon Cauchemez* [email protected]
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, London, UK.
Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.

Notes

*Corresponding author. E-mail: [email protected]

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